ACC Council of Presidents Sends Forth Initial Priorities as Part of the New Autonomy Structure

 

Each Priority to Benefit Prospective, Current and Former Student-Athletes

GREENSBORO, N.C. (theACC.com) – The Atlantic Coast Conference is submitting its initial priorities as part of the new autonomy structure that will help every student-athlete better achieve the kind of rewarding experience they deserve as part of the collegiate model. The priorities are being sent forward to the NCAA by the October 1 deadline.

Each of the priorities builds upon the ACC’s overall mission to emphasize both academic excellence and athletic competitiveness, seeking to maximize the educational and athletic opportunities of its student-athletes while enriching their quality of life.

“The ACC has consistently been a leader in appropriately balancing academics and athletics,” said Donna Shalala, Chair of the ACC Council of Presidents and President of the University of Miami. “The list of priorities that we are submitting to the NCAA reflects our determination to continue improving our student-athletes’ experience as an integral part of the educational missions of our world-class universities.”

“The collegiate model is a very special part of this country’s educational system and culture, and we believe the priorities set forth continue to focus on the importance of better addressing the needs of our student-athletes,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford. “The work that’s been done by our membership and now sent forth by the Council of Presidents shows a commitment to highlighting a more effective structure where these benefits can be realized.”

The Council’s priorities are a principled and disciplined approach to reform with a continued commitment to both male and female student-athletes and our broad-based programs.

The initial priorities being sent forward by the ACC include:

  • Examination of scholarship protections for student-athletes;
  • Meeting a student-athlete’s cost of attendance;
  • Ensuring institutional flexibility to provide educational support for former student-athletes;
  • Examination of career-related insurance options for student-athletes; and
  • Ensuring that nutritional needs of student-athletes are met in a reasonable way.  

Additional topics were also identified for further discussion and possible inclusion within future legislative cycles. These topics include, but are not limited to, exploring the time demands on student-athletes and safeguarding the right of student-athletes to enjoy the full educational opportunities and benefits available to other students.

The Council previously charged three subcommittees to evaluate the new NCAA autonomy topics relative to three subsets of student-athletes (prospective, current and former). Each subcommittee was chaired by a President and included a broad-based group of university practitioners that have expertise in the topics within each respective subcommittee. All 15 member institutions were represented between the three subcommittees. Following this work, the league’s 5-5-5 committee on autonomy reviewed the recommendations, which were then forwarded to the Council of Presidents.

About the ACC
The Atlantic Coast Conference, now in its 62nd year of competition and 15 members strong, has long enjoyed the reputation as one of the strongest and most competitive intercollegiate conferences in the nation. ACC members Boston College, Clemson, Duke, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Louisville, Miami, North Carolina, NC State, Notre Dame, Pitt, Syracuse, Virginia, Virginia Tech and Wake Forest continue to build upon the cornerstones on which the league was founded in 1953 with a consistent balance of academics, athletics and integrity.  For more information, visit theACC.com and follow @theACC on Twitter and on facebook.com/theACC.